The Archives

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Teaching Computers to Think Like Engineers

Monday, July 30th, 2012

The marine industry is increasingly adopting Condition-Based Maintenance (CBM) as cost-effective strategy for Reduced Total Ownership Cost, fostering the approach of performing maintenance only when objective evidence of need exists.  However, because of the special skills and time required to implement CBM, particularly as ship systems become more complex, future ship systems should employ artificial intelligence to make the equipment smart enough to assess its own health and alert control systems and crews of failures and  performance degradations.

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Sensors – The Eyes and Ears of Ship Automation – Part 2

Wednesday, June 13th, 2012

Sensors are the eyes and ears of your automation. Their health is essential to all shipboard monitoring and control functions that require reliable data to synthesize decisions.

In Part 2 of this series, we present some advanced research involving two multivariate machine learning algorithms; nonlinear state estimation and support vector machines, both applicable to shipboard sensor diagnostics. Data collected from a ship’s main propulsion gas turbine engine is used in the case study.

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Sensors – The Eyes and Ears of Ship Automation – Part 1

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Sensors are the eyes and ears of your automation. Their health (i.e. accuracy and reliability) is essential to all shipboard monitoring and control functions that require reliable data to synthesize decisions, which pretty much includes everything. What is surprising is that, even with this critical role in machinery control, sensor health has received scant attention in the marine industry. In fact, they represent the weak link in modern automation and control systems, from both a safety and a health monitoring perspective.

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Reducing the Risk of Diesel Engine Crankcase Explosions

Monday, April 30th, 2012

In a time when modern automation systems are supposed to prevent crankcase explosions and the ensuing engine room fires, these types of incidents are far from a rarity. In fact, several recent incidents, particularly in the cruise industry, have left ships without power for days and have resulted in financial losses totaling in the millions of dollars.

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Navy Picks DEXTER for LSD Class

Thursday, February 24th, 2011

Study shows high return, short payback
An independent Business Case Analysis, requested by the U.S. Navy, predicts a 13-to-1 return on investment (ROI) in maintenance cost savings with DEXTER for LSD class ships. Read More

Contract Issued for 4th LSD DEXTER Installation

Thursday, February 17th, 2011

MACSEA was recently awarded a task order to install its DEXTER Machinery Health Monitoring system aboard the USS Fort McHenry Read More

DEXTER Now Supports Open System Architecture via OPC

Tuesday, February 15th, 2011

MACSEA has significantly improved its DEXTER system’s integration options using an Open System Architecture approach. MACSEA’s latest I/O interface uses OLE for Process Control (OPC) and .NET to provide a robust and easy to deploy interface into any machinery control system that supports OPC. This allows DEXTER to read and write data to these systems using industry standard OPC technology. Read More